Since When Have Trees Existed Only for Rich Americans?

A New York Times Article on environment and discriminatory practices

Since When Have Trees Existed Only for Rich Americans highlights the extreme variation in tree coverage in large cities where the rich have 50% more greenery in their environment than the lower-income communities.

Stemming from discriminatory “redlining” policies of the past, the minimal greenery for impoverished American communities impacts everything from mental health to social connections to economic opportunities.

Please read the New York Times article in its entirety. (NMC students and employees can set up a free digital subscription to the New York Times using these instructions.)


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I Don’t See Color

When considering racism, a common response is often “I don’t see color.” While the intent isn’t generally harmful, and some may argue it as a positive response, the impact can be quite negative and includes denying someone of their racial identity. Read the article(s) below and then reflect on the following questions:

  1. What would make you or someone else want to say “I don’t see color?”
  2. If someone claims to not see color, what else are they not seeing about a person? Is this a good thing?
  3. How might you challenge this kind of thinking in yourself or in others?

“I don’t see color”:

“I don’t see color” while working with students:


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DEI Book Review

Book coverWhen They Call You A Terrorist:  A Black Lives Matter memoir was a moving description of the childhood and early BLM history of Patrisse Khan-Cullors, a young queer woman.  Most interesting to me was the experience of her impoverished childhood and how her education coupled with her resilience led her to be one of the founding women of Black Lives Matter. 

When They Call You A Terrorist is available at the NMC Library.


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Happy LGBTQ+ Pride Month!

Happy LGBTQ+ Pride Month! Have you ever wondered about the different terminology within the LGBTQ+ community? This quick reference poster is free to download and has brief definitions of commonly acceptable language (but not absolute). Check it out and learn about the terminology you’ve wondered about. Are there any you have never heard of before or some you might add?


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Sharing their story

Watch a TED talk that takes a walk through what Jesse Lueck calls their gender journey and walking through the world of non-binary. Interestingly reflecting on their pivotal college years and feeling a sense of belonging for the first time. Knowledge is power, because it matters. When we judge, when we question, when we politely (or not-so-politely) ignore. It matters. I encourage you to open your heart and minds, take a little time and hear a few stories that may change how you think, communicate, and even the way you walk through the world.


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What is privilege, and do I have any?

Having various kinds of privilege doesn’t mean your life has been a breeze, and it doesn’t negate the challenges you’ve faced. It just means there are certain barriers, struggles, and dangers you don’t have to worry much about as a result of your identity (i.e. race, sexual orientation). Read this short article about various types of privilege to better understand your own privilege, as well as how someone else may be disadvantaged. Talk to others about your thoughts and share the resource.


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Violence against Asian Americans

Violence against Asian Americans is increasing at an alarming rate. Read more here:

All NMC employees and students can set up a complimentary New York Times account through the library by following these instructions.


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An Introduction from the NMC Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Employee Committee

The Employee Group of the NMC Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Team will serve the DEI core team. The Employee Group will work to promote and engage employees in expanding knowledge of and opportunity with diversity, equity, and inclusion.

The Group’s broad charge is to initiate, foster, coordinate, evaluate and effectively communicate the diversity, equity and inclusion activities of the College through initiatives and events that support the goal of enhancing the environment for diversity, equity and inclusion within employees and extending to the college. The employee group will also take the lead in addressing areas of need and concern for NMC employees.

Currently, we are working on gathering information on our current state of diversity, equity and inclusion. Thank you if you completed the recent climate survey that was sent out. We are working on summarizing the responses, so a NMC action plan can begin to take form. We look forward to growing, celebrating, and valuing diversity together as employees of Northwestern Michigan College.

Watch the Intercom for “DEI: Insights and Conversations” where we plan to share DEI thoughts, challenges, and topics to get you thinking and keep you up to date on our projects.

Please fill out this DEI Intercom Post Feedback Form to be part of our conversation and offer feedback or suggestions on what is being shared.