Parking enforcement starts Jan. 20

The Traverse City Parking Patrol will begin issuing citations for parking violations at NMC on Monday, January 20. All NMC students and employees must have their 2019-2020 permits displayed by that date.

The Traverse City Police Department has provided the following information on how to avoid parking tickets on campus by properly displaying your parking permit:

  • Place your permit in the bottom left-hand corner of your windshield.
  • Place your permit right side up. An upside-down permit will be considered invalid.
  • Hangtags must be on the rearview mirror. 
  • Be sure that the expiration date on your permit can be seen from the outside of your vehicle. (Some vehicles have a tint on the edges of their windshield, so be sure your permit is not behind a tint, as it will make it difficult to see from the outside.) When it doubt, get out of your vehicle and be sure you can see the entire permit from the outside.

If you do get a ticket, payment can be made at the red drop-off payment box at the east end of the Cedar lot in front of the Health & Science Building on main campus. You can also mail the fine to the city, or pay at the parking services office in the public parking garage at 303 E. State St. Payment information is also on each ticket.

If you have any questions about parking enforcement on campus, please call Campus Safety & Security at (231) 995-1111.

Financial Aid Fair and scholarship events

TRAVERSE CITY — Enrollment Services at Northwestern Michigan College will offer two “pop-up” scholarship events this winter in addition to its annual Financial Aid Fair for prospective college students, parents, alumni, and current NMC students.

The two pop-up events will focus on NMC scholarships available to culinary students and will be held at Lobdell’s Teaching Restaurant on NMC’s Great Lakes campus, 715 E. Front St.

  • Tuesday, January 21, 5–7 p.m.
  • Friday, February 14, 10 a.m.–Noon

The Financial Aid Fair will be held from 4-7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12 in room 113 of the Osterlin Building. It offers half-hour workshop sessions and time for students to meet individually with a financial aid representative. Snacks will be included!

Sign up for half-hour workshop sessions at nmc.edu/financial-aid. Walk-ins are also welcome.

  • Counting the Cost of College – comparing schools (4–4:30 p.m., 5:30–6 p.m.)
  • Waivers and scholarships for Native American Students (4–4:30 p.m., 5:30–6 p.m.)
  • Types of Financial Aid (4:30-5 p.m., 6-6:30 p.m.)
  • How to Find and Apply for Scholarships (5–5:30 p.m., 6:30–7 p.m.)

Before or after the workshops, get one-on-one help with:

  • Completing the FAFSA by the March 1 State deadline
  • Applying for Scholarships
  • Completing financial aid requirements (for current NMC students)
  • Comparing award letters
  • Student loan counseling

ReLEASE DATE: January 16, 2020

For more information:

NMC Enrollment Services
(231) 995-1035
sfs@nmc.edu

 

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE

Northwestern Michigan College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, genetic information, height, weight, marital status or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. nmc.edu/non-discrimination

NMC joins basic needs initiative to support students

TRAVERSE CITY — NMC this month joins a statewide initiative to help students connect with resources to support basic needs. The Michigan Community College Association was awarded a $442,000 grant to launch the initiative focused on improving student completion and success by addressing economic instability among students including access to food, housing, transportation, childcare and other basic needs.

The Michigan – Building Economic Stability Today (MI-BEST) effort is funded through June 2022 by a grant from the Los Angeles-based ECMC Foundation as part of its Basic Needs Initiative, designed to address and alleviate basic needs insecurity among students. National survey findings reported that 45 percent of respondents had been food insecure in the past 30 days, 56 percent had been housing insecure in the previous year and 17 percent had been homeless during that year.

NMC will begin by forming a team of college personnel and community leaders. Dean of Students Lisa Thomas, NMC’s project lead, said members will include executive leadership, advisers, faculty, development/fundraising staff, financial aid staff and community partners.

“What I would hope is we learn some ways to better structure or provide internal supports to our students,” Thomas said.

NMC has offered a food pantry since November 2017. It serves between 80 and 90 people per month. This year’s usage is on pace to equal the 2018 academic year, the first full year of operation, when 1,087 total people were served.
In addition to the food pantry, Thomas also has emergency textbook funds available, as well as gas cards and BATA passes for students with transportation issues. Now, accessing those resources is handled on a case by case basis, rather than systematically.

“We’re going to take a deep dive to see what are the structures and processes in place at NMC to see what is supporting or what is a barrier to students completing their education,” Thomas said.

The Michigan Center for Student Success is leading the initiative for the MCCA and will partner with nationally-recognized organizations including the National Center for Inquiry and Improvement and Trellis Research along with Michigan-based organizations including the Michigan Association of United Ways, MiBridges, and Public Policy Associates to support Michigan’s participating community colleges.

“We know that the lack of access to basic needs is frequently the reason that students leave college,” said Erica Lee Orians, executive director of the Michigan Center for Student Success at the MCCA. “NMC’s participation in this initiative is a critical component of our student success efforts.”

The Michigan Center for Student Success, founded in 2011, serves as a hub connecting leadership, administrators, faculty, and staff in their emerging and ongoing efforts to improve student outcomes, emphasizing linkages between practice, research, and policy. The Center has led statewide initiatives focused on reengaging adults, developmental education, transfer, veterans, and advising. The Center is part of the 16-state Student Success Center Network working with over half of the community colleges across the nation.

Release date: January 14, 2019

For more information:

Lisa Thomas
Dean of Students
lthomas@nmc.edu
(231) 995-1043

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE

Northwestern Michigan College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, genetic information, height, weight, marital status or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. nmc.edu/non-discrimination

Intramural Basketball Sign-up

Intramural Basketball Sign-up

All players must be current NMC students, all teams must be co-ed, at least one female player must be on the court at all times or you will play short. female points count double.

Season starts Monday, January 27 for six weeks.

Two games per week played Monday–Thursday at 2:10, 3:10 or 4:10 p.m. or new time offering Sundays 9:10, 10:10 p.m.

Mandatory Captains’ meeting and Sign-up Deadline – Thursday, January 23 at 3 p.m. in the PE Lobby.

For more information or questions, please call Steve Dixon at (231) 995-1379.

** Registration forms are located throughout campus or you can pick one up at the fitness center in North Hall **

Flu Shots available

The CDC has reported that this season’s influenza virus is the worst encountered in many years. Health Services just received another shipment of influenza vaccine. Due to the severity of the flu this year, it is important to get a flu shot which is your best option for prevention.

Please stop by Health Services, LB106, anytime between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday for a flu shot.

Shots are free for faculty and staff with NMC health insurance, $20 for those without, and $15 for students (which is below our cost and the cheapest in town).

Outstanding Alumni nominations due

TRAVERSE CITY — The Northwestern Michigan College alumni program is seeking nominations for the 2020 Outstanding Alumni award. Nominations will be accepted through Feb. 28.

Celebrated since 1988, the Outstanding Alumni award recognizes alumni for significant professional achievements and/or exemplary leadership in the local or global community. The award(s) will be presented at NMC’s annual Commencement ceremony May 2.

Nomination forms are available online. Nominations may also be e-mailed to Director of Alumni Relations, Cameron Penny, at alumni@nmc.edu or mailed to NMC Alumni Relations, 1701 E. Front St., Traverse City, MI 49686.

The 2019 Outstanding Alumni recipients were Terry Beia, Frank Dituri and Marie Socha.

Release date: JANUARY 9, 2020

For more information:

Cameron Penny
Director of Alumni Relations
cpenny@nmc.edu
(231) 995-2825

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE

Northwestern Michigan College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, genetic information, height, weight, marital status or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. nmc.edu/non-discrimination

Pop-Up Scholarship & Financial-Aid Events!

Are you a current or prospective student looking for help with financial aid and searching for scholarship opportunities? Join us at Lobdell’s at NMC’s Great Lakes campus for one of two pop-up financial aid events:

  • Tuesday, January 21st, 5 – 7 p.m.
  • Friday, February 14th, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Questions? Call enrollment services (231)995-1052

Lobdell’s: A Teaching Restaurant
NMC’s Great Lakes Campus, 715 E. Front St., Traverse City

Success Story: Listening, learning on Nick Nissley’s short-term agenda

January 8, 2020

NMC President Nick NissleyNick Nissley is diving into his tenure as NMC’s 11th president, immersing himself 24-7 on campus and in the region, from hiking at Empire Bluffs to dining at Front Street restaurants to a packed schedule of meetings with college stakeholders.

Among the first is a community welcome reception set for 5-7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, at the Hagerty Center on NMC’s Great Lakes campus.

Nissley, 53, comes from Cincinnati and says there’s no place he’d rather be than NMC. His first day was Jan. 2, but the education executive with 25 years of leadership experience said he’s been doing his homework on the college since his contract was finalized in October 2019.

“It’s obvious to me, NMC is a strong college in a strong community – it has a proud history and a future of possibilities,” said Nissley, who describes himself as a  “possibilitarian.”

Determining which possibilities the college pursues means using this onboarding time to listen and learn. With the NMC Board and executive staff, Nissley intends to orient himself to NMC and northern Michigan by gathering information and building relationships in order to develop an understanding of what requires immediate attention; beginning an inventory of perceived organizational strengths and weaknesses and identifying key strategic challenges and opportunities.

“Ultimately, the listening and learning will help inform our ‘next steps’ as we seek to advance the College mission, together,” Nissley said, adding he considers it a privilege to be at NMC, the beneficiary of strong leadership and community support throughout its history.

“I believe in NMC’s role, that we have played historically, and that we must imagine together as we look to the future – our role in improving the lives of people and strengthening the fabric of our community.

Community invited to new president reception

TRAVERSE CITY — Northwestern Michigan College invites the community to meet its 11th president, Nick Nissley, at a welcome reception from 5–7 p.m. Friday Jan. 17, at the Hagerty Center at NMC’s Great Lakes campus.

Nissley, an education executive with more than 25 years of experience, says there’s no place he’d rather be than NMC. While his first day in the office was Jan. 2,  Nissley said he’s been doing his homework on the college since his contract was finalized in October 2019.

“It’s obvious to me, NMC is a strong college in a strong community – it has a proud history and a future of possibilities,” he said. “Being here at NMC is a calling. It’s a calling for me to share my strengths.”

Those strengths are broad and diverse. Nissley’s career includes experience in K-12, community college and university settings. He has leadership experience in fundraising, professional development, human resources, teaching and the arts. His areas of focus include helping build individual and organization capabilities that support organizational effectiveness and innovation cultures in support of educational excellence.  Nissley describes himself as a collaborative servant leader and “possibilitarian.”

“I believe in NMC’s role that we have played historically, and that we must imagine together as we look to the future – our role in improving the lives of people and strengthening the fabric of our community. Together, let’s be driven to think and act beyond boundaries, and to achieve more than was originally imagined. That’s the possibilitarian spirit of NMC,” he said.

RSVPs are not required and there is no cost to attend the reception, which will include hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar.

Nissley’s most recent position was Executive Director of Cincinnati’s School for Creative & Performing Arts (SCPA) — the first K-12 public creative and performing arts magnet school in the country, recognized as a model magnet arts school and a crown jewel of Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS). He previously served as Dean of the Business Division of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, one of Ohio’s largest community colleges.

Release date: January 7, 2019

For more information:

Diana Fairbanks
Executive Director of Public Relations, Marketing and Communications
dfairbanks@nmc.edu
(231) 995-1019

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE

Northwestern Michigan College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, genetic information, height, weight, marital status or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. nmc.edu/non-discrimination

Hello and Happy New Year from Nick Nissley!

Good Afternoon NMC Community!

There’s nowhere that I’d rather be today. Being here, at NMC, is a sort of calling. It’s a calling for me to share my strengths as: a possibilitarian and a servant leader. As a servant leader, I understand that my role is primarily to assist in the accomplishments and fulfillment of the hopes and expectations of others. Ultimately, that means my role is to help you as you transform student lives through the power of education. And, as a possibilitarian, I am committed to helping others to think and act beyond boundaries, and to achieve more than was originally imagined. It’s obvious to me, NMC is a strong college in a strong community – it has a proud history and a future of possibilities. As NMC’s 11th President, I am well aware that I am the beneficiary of smart decisions made by my predecessors, and I am equally passionate about sharing my leadership strengths to make a difference for our students, the faculty/staff, and the institution of NMC. I believe in NMC’s role, that we have played historically, and that we must imagine together as we look to the future – our role in improving the lives of people and strengthening the fabric of our community. So, together, let’s be driven to think and act beyond boundaries, and to achieve more than was originally imagined. That’s the possibilitarian spirit of NMC.

I appreciate that the presidency is a privileged position, not a position of privilege. I feel privileged to be able to serve and be a steward of such an awesome, profound mission. I have been preparing over the past few months, ‘doing my homework’. I have been devouring all that I can put my hands on in terms of ‘orientation materials’ (e.g., College reports, budgets, history books, and briefings), as well as engaging in conversations with the former President, Tim Nelson, and our NMC Board Chair, Chris Bott. While the very steep learning curve will obviously continue, I feel like I have a growing foundation of knowledge about the College, strong support from the College/community, and a desire to work together to continue to make a difference in the lives of those that we serve.

Northwestern Michigan College has been referred to as the community’s college, not just a community college. And, it’s already becoming clear to me, that what distinguishes NMC faculty and staff is that you have diligently served the mission-inspired tagline from the first NMC Catalog in 1951: “Community Centered, Community Serving”. We will continue that mission-driven focus.

As I’ve been going about the work of transitioning into the President role, and to further my learning, I’ve met with some other college presidents, over the past few months, including Jim Votruba, past president of Northern Kentucky University. Jim’s family owns Votruba Leather Goods, here, in Traverse City. A piece of advice that I took away from my conversation with Jim was his counsel, “Be sure that people know that you’ve unpacked your bags.” His point – that I need to demonstrate that I’m committed to the College/community for the long haul. Rest assured, my bags are unpacked. Our family has bought a home on Old Mission Peninsula. While my wife and daughters are finishing up the school year, back in Cincinnati, given that I have a high school senior and freshman; they will be joining me in early summer. That means I’ll be looking forward to being 100% present for you!

So, what can you expect from me as we get started? I will be listening and learning. Together, with NMC Board Chair, Chris Bott, and the NMC Executive Team, we have developed an ‘onboarding plan’ – a plan to identify the ‘first steps’ to guide my orientation to NMC, and pave the way for me to become acclimated and informed relative to the role and responsibilities.

Specifically, the onboarding plan will help me hear from the College community: 1) gather information, develop understanding, and build relationships; 2) develop understanding of what requires immediate attention; 3) begin an inventory of perceived organizational strengths and weaknesses; 4) identification of key strategic challenges and opportunities; and, 5) afford me insight to aspirations/possibilities.

The activities detailed in the plan serve as a blueprint for my entry into NMC. As with all blueprints, adjustments may have to be made as we progress. It’s intended to be a ‘living document’. The plan has been intentionally developed to acknowledge my areas of focus: listening and learning about the College’s history; the institution’s strengths and weaknesses; and, challenges and opportunities. Ultimately, the listening and learning will help inform our ‘next steps’ as we seek to advance the College mission, together.

I look forward to meeting you next week at the January Mid-Year Opening Conference, and as I visit you in your areas around campus. Together, let’s be what’s possible!

 – Nick Nissley, Ed.D.

Walk-In Advising

Classes start January 10 and you still need help with your Spring schedule?! We can help! Stop by the Advising Center from 9am to 4pm January 13-20 for Walk-In Advising, additional dates also available the week leading up to the semester with varying times, all dates and times listed below. Sessions are on a first-come-first-served basis. (231) 995-1040 for questions.

  • Monday, 1/6: 12:30 – 4 p.m.
  • Tuesday, 1/7: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday, 1/8: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Thursday, 1/9: 9:00 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Friday, 1/10: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Monday 1/13 – Friday 1/17: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Monday 1/20 – 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

2020 Films at the Dennos – Build community, spark conversation, inspire change

The Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College will continue its free film program presented by Indy Lens Pop-Up in 2020 to connect audiences of all ages with the arts. Films cover racial, environmental, housing, and other issues that frame the theme of neighborhood. Additional information can be found online at dennosmuseum.org.

Indie Lens Pop-Up, a national program that has partnered with the Dennos Museum Center for 11 years, is a neighborhood series that brings people together for film screenings and community-driven conversations. Featuring documentaries seen on the PBS series Independent Lens, Indie Lens Pop-Up draws local residents, leaders, and organizations to discuss what matters most, from newsworthy topics to family and relationships. All films are free and provide pre-film refreshments and post-film discussion.

Supported in part by Morsels of Traverse City.

Thursday, February 13, 2020 — 7:00PM Always in Season By Jacqueline Olive

 

In Always in Season, descendants of the victims and perpetrators of lynching are working together to heal a violent history. Blending observational footage with first-person testimonies and expert input, Always in Season examines the lingering impact of lynching and the link between this historic form of racial terrorism and the racial violence that exists today.

Thursday, March 5, 2020 — 7:00PM Bedlam By Kenneth Paul Rosenburg

 

Filmmaker and practicing psychiatrist, Ken Rosenberg visits ERs, jails, and homeless camps to examine our national mental health crisis. Rosenberg follows the poignant stories of people grappling with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other chronic psychiatric conditions, whose silence and shame often worsen the suffering.

Thursday, April 23, 2020 — 7:00 PM Eating Up Easter By Sergio Mata’u Rapu

 

Easter Island is a microcosm of a planet in flux. Native Rapanui grapple with a booming tourism trade that rakes in money, but brings about a changing climate that threatens the fragile ecology on the island. Rapanui filmmaker Sergio Mata’u Rapu gives voice to his fellow islanders, who struggle to balance their strong cultural heritage with modern-day challenges.

Thursday, May 14, 2020 — 7:00PM Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project By Matt Wolf

 

 

Marion Stokes secretly recorded television twenty-four hours a day for thirty years. It started in 1979 with the dawn of the twenty-four hour news cycle and ended when Marion passed away in 2012. In total, Marion recorded on 70,000 VHS tapes, capturing revolutions, lies, wars, triumphs, and catastrophes that tell us who we were and how television has shaped the world of today.

The Dennos Museum Center is open daily 10 AM to 5 PM, Thursday until 8 PM, and Sundays 1-5 PM. For information on the Museum and its programs, go to www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos Museum Center is located at 1410 College Dr., Traverse City, MI 49686, at the entrance to the campus of Northwestern Michigan College.

Winter 2020 exhibitions at the Dennos Museum Center!

The Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College is pleased to present three new exhibitions scheduled to open on January 19, 2020. Each exhibition explores some aspect of bravery and resiliency: from Howard G. Buffet’s photographs that document world hunger in 40 Chances, to artist Karen Bondarchuk’s struggle to make sense of Alzheimer’s disease in Ergo Sum: A Crow a Day, artists translate and decipher the world around us in ways that are relatable and meaningful. And in Pulped Under Pressure: The Art of Handmade Paper, seven contemporary artists experiment with one of society’s most ubiquitous of materials—paper— to “address some of the most pressing issues (environmental crisis to global marginalization) facing civilization today.”

A variety of public programs will occur throughout the winter months to connect audiences of all ages with these exhibitions. More information can be found online at dennosmuseum.org.

Exhibitions at the Dennos Museum Center are made possible with support provided by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Robert T. and Ruth Haidt Hughes Memorial Endowment Fund, with media support from TV 7&4 and TV 9&10.

40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World January 19 – April 26, 2020
Justo Angel Torrez Diaz

Eight-year-old Justo Angel Torrez Diaz’s family improved their coffee production methods by using more sustainable agriculture practices. (Howard G. Buffett)

In this powerful exhibit featuring the photography of Howard G. Buffett, 40 photographs document the world hunger crisis as part of a global awareness campaign. Traveling to more than 137 countries, Buffett turned his camera lens on the powerful forces that fuel hunger and poverty. A philanthropist and farmer, Buffett believes that each of us has about 40 chances to accomplish our life goals, just as farmers have about 40 growing seasons to improve their harvests. His photography is a call to action to find lasting solutions to the world hunger crisis.

40 Chances: Finding Hope in a Hungry World was developed by the Newseum in collaboration with Howard G. Buffett Foundation. The Newseum, located in Washington, D.C., increases public understanding of the importance of free press and the First Amendment. newseum.org

Ergo Sum: A Crow a Day January 19 – May 24, 2020
Ergo Sum

365 pieces, 7-¾” x 5-¾” each Media: charcoal, ink, graphite, pastel, Pigma Micron, gold leaf, and press-type on handmade gessoed panels

On August 1, 2014, Canadian-born artist Karen Bondarchuk set out to mark the passing time that her mother – diagnosed with dementia in 2010 – no longer could. For 365 days, she produced a crow a day on a hand-cut, hand-gessoed panel, remembering her mother as she once was and grieving her loss. The resulting work explores communication and an artist’s relationship to the world; it resonates for its depth, beauty, and elegiac and potent whimsy.

In the artist’s own words: “I began this series on August 1, 2014, as a way to honor my mother who is in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease. I chose to create a crow drawing every day for 365 days as a way of marking time that she no longer seems to recognize. Crows have figured largely in my work for several years and represent both the quotidian and the extraordinary – akin to the Buddhist notion of “ordinary magic.” The labor that went into producing each of the 365 panels – cutting the wood, preparing my own gesso from gelatin and powdered limestone, building up layers, and sanding between coats in preparation for the actual process of creating an image – seemed to evoke the overwhelming labor and repetitious activities of motherhood. The series is simultaneously a marker of my mother’s lost time and a constant and acute reminder of my own days, my life, and an attempt to signal visually the preciousness and individuality of each day. Although the project seemed sober to me at its outset, quirky cheer and serendipity came to inhabit many of the panels.”

Ergo Sum: A Crow a Day is organized by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, Wisconsin

Pulped Under Pressure: The Art of Handmade Paper January 19 –  May 24, 2020
Psyche-Anthropocene Projection

Psyche-Anthropocene Projection, 2013 Handmade paper, inclusions, PVA 30” x 70” x 1½” (installed) (each panel 30” x 22”)

With traditional hand papermaking at its core, Pulped Under Pressure underscores important contemporary issues steeped in history and craft. Enticed through touch, these works encourage a contemplative slowing down even as they urge acknowledgment of some of the most pressing issues (environmental crisis to global marginalization) facing civilization today.

Each of the artists, Jillian Bruschera, Julia Goodman, Reni Gower, Trisha Oralie Martin, Melissa Potter, Marilyn Propp, Maggie Puckett, start simply with a foundation of pulp made from natural fibers. Their multifaceted results incorporate a rich range of printmaking, letterpress, papercutting, and installation with a diversity of recycled disposable materials (junk mail, egg cartons, old cotton t-shirts, ripped denim jeans) as well as old bedsheets, beetroot, heirloom plants, and electroluminescent wires.

In very unique ways, these artists consider paper beyond its most common function as a passive surface of record or craft. Instead, the material is transformed and imbedded with content that turns communication into a public practice. By challenging assumptions, the artists of Pulped Under Pressure create artworks that are both beautiful and brave.

Pulped Under Pressure: The Art of Handmade Paper is co-curated by Reni Gower and Melissa Hilliard Potter and organized by Wylie Contemporary, Inc.

The Dennos Museum Center at Northwestern Michigan College is open daily 10 AM to 5 PM, and Sundays 1-5 PM. For information on the Museum and its programs, visit dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The Dennos Museum Center is located at 1410 College Dr., Traverse City, MI 49686, at the entrance to the campus of Northwestern Michigan College.

50% Off New Year Sale at the Dennos Museum Store

 

Come by the store after Christmas for 50% off all holiday merchandise, holiday cards, planners and calendars while they last! Also, save on select exhibit related merchandise as we begin to change over exhibits! Sale begins December 26th at the Dennos Museum Store and continues while supplies last!

Kahler named PTK Faculty Scholar

Kari KahlerKari Kahler (click for high-resolution version)JACKSON, Miss. — The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society (PTK) has selected NMC’s Kari Kahler as one of 30 chapter advisers to serve as Faculty Scholars during the organization’s 2020 summer conference, to be held in Chicago in June.

Kahler, associate dean of Learning Services, has served as adviser to NMC’s chapter of PTK, the international community college honor society, since 1997 and as the Michigan Regional Coordinator since 2010. Faculty Scholars are key figures at Honors Institute, PTK’s annual weeklong honors conference, as they lead small groups of the attendees in discussions about presentations by keynote speakers.

Each speaker is an expert on an idea related to PTK’sHonors Study Topic, the focus of the organization’s honors program. Students will explore the 2020 Honors Study Topic: “To the Seventh Generation: Inheritance and Legacy” and Kahler will discuss the importance of leadership in building your personal legacy.

“Honors Institute sets the stage for many of our chapters to begin their honors projects, which is where some of the deepest benefits of PTK membership come into play,” said Dr. Blake Ellis, PTK’s Vice President of Student Engagement. “The guidance Faculty Scholars give can be the first step in igniting a student’s passion, getting them involved, and setting them on a course to gain leadership experience and develop soft skills.”

Phi Theta Kappa’s honors program guides chapters in a research-based, action-oriented project on their campuses and in their communities. The timely, interdisciplinary topic is developed biannually by a group of volunteer chapter advisors known as the Honors Program Council.

Phi Theta Kappa is the premier honor society recognizing the academic achievement of students at associate degree-granting colleges and helping them to grow as scholars and leaders. The Society is made up of more than 3.5 million members and nearly 1,300 chapters in 11 nations, with approximately 250,000 active members in the nation’s
colleges. Learn more at ptk.org.

Release date: December 19, 2019

For more information:

Diana Fairbanks
Executive Director of Public Relations, Marketing and Communications
dfairbanks@nmc.edu
(231) 995-1019

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY NOTICE

Northwestern Michigan College is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, genetic information, height, weight, marital status or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions. nmc.edu/non-discrimination

Success Story: First EL Fellows selected

December 18, 2019

This month, as Experiential Learning expands at NMC, the community has an opportunity to take advantage of one of the most enduring EL projects, while five faculty members selected as the college’s first class of EL Fellows will substantially convert their courses to the high-impact instructional style’s principles in 2020.

EL principles include students working in teams, immersive experiences or project-based assignments, and flipped classrooms, with faculty offering guidance and help more than direct instruction. All of those are embedded in the community opportunity offered by NMC’s Visual Communications department, which invites area non-profits to submit graphic design, art direction and new media projects by Jan. 6 for consideration as pro bono class projects during the spring semester.

Instructor Caroline Schaefer-Hills introduced the studio format to the class in 2002.

“It’s almost a mini-internship,” Schaefer-Hills said. “Our students are having real-world experiences and printed and produced pieces before they transfer.”

Traverse Chamber logo2019 projects included logos for the Traverse City Area Chamber of Commerce (right), Northwest Michigan Arts & Culture Network, and Wagbo Farm & Education Center. Past projects included the design for the local Bay Bucks currency, streetscape and signage for the city of Alden, and newsletters and brochures for TART Trails.

Schaefer-Hills is also one of the first EL fellows selected for 2020. The fellows project is one of the first initiatives of NMC’s Experiential Learning Institute, announced earlier this year.

Chosen across disparate disciplines, the instructors have committed to making substantial conversions of their courses to experiential learning principles. They are Brian Sweeney, metallurgy; Tammara Coleman (biology) & Lisa Blackford (social science) working together on a new class called the Science of Stress; John Velis, Computer Information Technology; and Sarah Montgomery-Richards, philosophy.

Fisher Heck and Lisa BlackfordEach applicant met minimum criteria set by the Institute and were then chosen by lottery. Blackford has gradually converted both her social work and psychology classes from traditional lecture format to experiential learning. This semester, she structured her Psychology 100 course to culminate in a “Psymposium” in which teams of students debated theories and questions from different psychological perspectives in a timed competition. One student, Fisher Heck (right, with Lisa), went so far as to dress up as Sigmund Freud.

“I think they learned more in the last two weeks doing this than anything I taught them,” said Blackford, who held the Psymposium in a theatre-style classroom.

Vis Comm projects will be completed by the end of the spring semester in April 2019.

A brief description of the project and the organization’s needs are required and should be sent via email to cschaefer@nmc.edu by Jan. 6. Contact Schaefer-Hills at (231) 995-1334 for more information.

Experiential Learning has been a college focus since late 2016. The new West Hall Innovation Center, slated for completion in 2020, will be key to implementing EL campus-wide.